What Richard Branson Can Teach Recruiters About Delegation- Part 2

Posted by nicky

March 24th, 2015

In the last article we talked about the value of delegation when it comes to your own recruitment growth plans.

My experience with recruitment business owners is that delegations doesn’t come easily. It is a choice and a skill to embrace. Not surprisingly those that do it well have companies on a significant growth trajectory.

The delegation principle

Here are some useful questions to start the process of deciding where delegation can fit in your organisation

  • What tasks are not good use of my time?
  • What do I want to delegate?
  • Who will I delegate this to?
  • How will I help the team?
  • Is this a task to delegate or a new role in the organisation?

When I first start working with billing managers and directors I ask them to fill out a ‘time log’ that I have developed.

 

Flat Style Icon with Long Shadow. A time log.

 

Because of the way it is designed people soon become acutely aware of where they are spending their valuable time, or not.

This then frames the next stage which is considering what tasks might be best completed by somebody else.

My own mentor always challenges me on my £ per hour activities and what my time is really worth.

For example you might be an amazing biller and yet, do you really need to be doing your own resourcing?? The answer is no by the way! Better to create a process flow and train someone else to do it.

The challenge for many people is what can you delegate? More than you think provided you adhere to this premise.

Delegation isn’t Abdication

There are numerous books on delegation and the one minute manager is still a classic. My own experience over the years and particularly the last 10 years has helped me hone down to some guiding steps.

copy_of_oneminutemanager

 

Expect the best- the power of intention

Expectation is a powerful thing. Expect a positive outcome and you will probably get it. Cheer them on, believe they can do it and watch for a positive result provided…

 

Two happy business people laughing during office break

 

Chose the right person and the right task

If you read this blog I know you want to create a powerful team and will be a student of communication and building great relationships. Use this knowledge here. If Jane is the worst at figures in the team, giving her a task centred on accuracy and reporting straight off the bat wouldn’t be a smart idea.

What about John? If he is analytical and loves to research perhaps he could be your ideal resourcer with some training from you.

The devil is in the detail

A classic mistake in the art of delegation is lack of detail. As leaders in an organisation you are likely preferenced for the big picture-think strategy here.

Which is exactly what you need in your role as the CEO or MD. However not when you are giving a task to someone who doesn’t understand the steps or process.

The key is striking the right balance between explaining so much detail that the listener is insulted, and not explaining enough for someone to grasp what is expected.

Deadlines and review

Avoid being so happy that you have finally delegated a task that you forget to set a deadline. A common mistake even I made last week.

 

Deadline written on a white calendar page

 

For instance say this….

“Can you finish this by Friday Andy?”

Rather than…….

“Is that OK Andy; great? Let me know when you have finished that research.”

Andy won’t appreciate how long this is going to take. If it is a skill area of his probably less than you think. If not allow more time in the initial stages.

Keep your ego on hold and say thank you

Prepare to be shocked because your new keen ‘sponge’ and soon to be, right hand person, might just have completed that task better than you.

Embrace the gift you have just received as Sam Carpenter the author says our ultimate goal is to make ourselves redundant.

As you feel the relief wash over you remember to use a special 8 letter word; thankyou.

Next steps

Ready to get going? Go back to the questions I shared earlier and start with those low value tasks that you need to stop and then take it from there.

I hope you found this article useful.  If you would like some more tips on how to deal with the inner game or help your team to deal with their inner game – Join my FREE Webinar The 6 Step System to Convert Your Under Performers to High Billers in 14 days or Less’ 

Click on this link to sign up: 6 Steps Convert your Under Performers to High Billers

 

Warmest regards,

 

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